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Creating posts from my phone part 2

In the last post I discussed why I am using my phone to create and publish these posts.  In this post I will discuss how I create the posts.  I will also discuss some of the apps and other tools on my development machine that I am using to help create screenshots and code samples.



I started out just trying the Blogger post editor on my phone.  I thought I could at least work on the post contents, even if I couldn't create completed posts.  Everything in the editor seemed to work fine.  My phone is a Galaxy S5 with Chrome for Android.  I'm using a custom keyboard called Hacker's Keyboard.  The only problem I ran into here was that there isn't enough room for everything in landscape mode.  The keyboard allows you to have a full keyboard even in portrait mode though.  The keys are small but I am getting used to it.



After I realized I could create post content I wondered if I could do more.  I am doing most of my code samples as Gists.  I decided to take a look at the Github app, so I installed the official app.  It lets you view and edit your Gists, so it is just what I needed.

Now I could make pretty decent articles.  I am also able to load pages that are on my local dev machine and take screenshots.  That way I can show the results of executing code.

Next time I will go into more detail about how I access my local dev machine without being able to change the host file on my phone.  It isn't rooted.  Also I will get into how I am able to author and run code on my dev machine from my phone.


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